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a catch 22 for the PRC

Free Tibet.I haven’t been able to read up on many recent Tibet issues today, basically there doesn’t seem to be a whole lot happening at this moment.  One can’t have too many expectations when the PRC has instituted what amounts to military law at numerous monasteries spread throughout Tibet, including Lhasa.

Time Magazine’s, Simon Elegant in Beijing, wrote a compelling article, “The High Cost of Control,” about what many of Tibet interest group heads have been saying regarding recent China/Tibet history and the recent protest with the run up to the Olympics.  Jiang of the University of Alberta shares in this article some of my  own sentiments,

This insecurity underlies the central government’s heavy-handed tactics and rhetoric, even though repression reduces the country’s stature in the global community. “When the rest of the world looks at China, they see this increasingly powerful and confident country spending more and more on its military, its economy booming, its financial power overseas growing,” says Jiang of the University of Alberta. “But when Chinese leadership looks at the country they see the exact opposite: weaknesses everywhere from Tibet to Xinjiang, to rising inflation and civil unrest, environmental disasters and corruption. So the overall mentality of the central authorities is very insecure and nervous.” Jiang argues that the only way to move toward a solution in Tibet is to negotiate with the Dalai Lama. But he says leaders are now trapped by their own words, which have fueled passionate nationalist sentiments among ordinary Chinese, who fervently believe that Tibet is Chinese territory. Any appearance of compromise by Beijing would likely be intolerable to the public, Jiang says.

Therein lies that catch 22.

The end of Simon’s article inspires me the most.  He summarizes what could be a real turning point of global opinions of China and journalists visiting during the 2008 Summer Olympics.

The authorities will no doubt make it virtually impossible for journalists to enter Tibet in the months leading up to the Olympics. But it remains unclear exactly how they intend to deal with the estimated 30,000 foreign reporters expected to witness the event, all of them eager to take advantage of Beijing’s own regulations specifying that they can interview anyone Chinese who agrees to talk. “They still don’t have any idea what is going to hit them or how bad they will look to the outside world,” comments one senior Western academic who has close ties to the upper echelons of the Beijing establishment. If its conduct over the past year is anything to go by, Beijing’s instinctive reaction to new problems will be to use its heavy hand once more.

Only time will tell.. and hopefully it’s the truth…uncensored.

1 comment to a catch 22 for the PRC

  • […] MattBob’s Killer Webspace… wrote an interesting post today on a catch 22 for the PRCHere’s a quick excerpt … weaknesses everywhere from Tibet to Xinjiang, to rising inflation and civil unrest, environmental disasters and corruption…. One can’t have too many expectations when the PRC has instituted what amounts to military law at numerous monasteries spread throughout Tibet, including L hasa….” Jiang argues that the only way to move toward a solution in Tibet is to negotiate with the Dalai Lama….But he says leaders are now trapped by their own words, which have fueled passionate nationalist sentiments among ordinary Chinese, who fervently believe that Tibet i s Chinese territory…. […]

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